Before a person buys a property, they naturally want to inspect it. It would be highly unusual not to allow an inspection because they are absolutely necessary to know the real state of a piece of property or home before it is purchased. Buyers generally have a right to inspect any property they’ve said that they want to buy, but not unless they’ve already made an offer. Once an offer is made, they may ask for an inspection or waive that right. 

Once under a contract, the buyer will be limited to a certain timeframe for the inspection. For example, you may agree with the buyer to give them a week to complete their inspection, after which time they lose the right to do so. Some buyers will only agree to contracts that would allow them to withdraw their offer if the inspection does not go well. There are different kinds of contracts that you can offer as a seller, so you will want to discuss this with your attorney.

Home inspections will generally look for many different issues, from trouble in the heating or cooling system to finding damage in the basement or the foundation. If issues are found, the buyer may ask to be let out of the purchase, could ask you to repair the damage or make a new offer at a lower rate. If the inspection goes well, then the purchase may be able to go forward without any other delays.

Home inspections are both important and routine, so it’s a good idea to allow buyers to inspect the property once they’ve made an offer. They do not, however, prevent all real estate conflicts involving the purchase of a home. If you encounter one, it may be wise to speak with an experienced advocate about your situation.